What Is Lausanne Agreement

The Lausanne Agreement, also known as the Lausanne Protocol or the Lausanne Treaty, was signed on July 24, 1923, in Lausanne, Switzerland, between Turkey and the Allied Powers of World War I.

The agreement was signed to resolve the issues that arose from the Treaty of Sèvres, which was imposed on the Ottoman Empire after WWI ended. The Treaty of Sèvres was highly unpopular in Turkey and was seen as a humiliation to the country.

The Lausanne Agreement, however, was a significant turning point in Turkey`s history, as it recognized its sovereignty and established its borders. It also allowed Turkey to regain control of its territories, including Anatolia, which was previously under Greek control.

The agreement also addressed the issue of minorities in Turkey. The Treaty of Sèvres had guaranteed protection for minorities in Turkey, but the Lausanne Agreement revised this provision and recognized that Turkey had the right to “assimilate or expel” its minorities.

In addition, the agreement granted Turkey exemption from war reparations, which it was required to pay under the Treaty of Sèvres, thereby significantly reducing its financial burden.

The Lausanne Agreement has been praised as a landmark achievement in international diplomacy. It not only recognized Turkey`s sovereignty but also paved the way for better relations between Turkey and the Allied Powers.

The agreement remains significant today as it continues to shape Turkey`s foreign policy and its relationship with the international community. Its impact can be seen in Turkey`s modernization efforts and its integration with the global economy.

In conclusion, the Lausanne Agreement was a crucial development in Turkey`s history, as it recognized Turkey`s sovereignty and established its borders. It also addressed the issue of minorities and granted Turkey exemption from war reparations. Its significance continues to be felt today, as it continues to shape Turkey`s foreign policy and relationship with the international community.